Solar Eclipses

2024 Total Solar Eclipse

  • NASA map and facts for 2024-04-08: https://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEplot/SEplot2001/SE2024Apr08T.GIF

  • 2024 Eclipse Maps by State - https://nationaleclipse.com/maps.html

  • There are some major U.S. cities in the path of totality with approximate eclipse durations as follows: Ft Worth, Dallas (3min51s), Little Rock (2min29s), Indianapolis (3min52s), Cleveland (3min48s), Buffalo (3min45s), Rochester (3min39s). Then in Canada, there's Montreal (1min40s). Did I mention Niagara Falls (3min32s)? [Eclipse durations estimated from NASA's interactive google eclipse map https://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEgoogle/SEgoogle2001/SE2024Apr08Tgoogle.html]
    There are other major cities that are damn close to the path of totality: San Antonio, St Louis, Louisville, Cincinnati, Pittsburgh, Manchester NH, Portland ME.
    In terms of hitting the highest concentration population centers, the 2024 eclipse probably beats the "Great American Eclipse" of 2017 by a pretty fair margin.

General eclipse pages

Eclipse Safety

See https://eclipse.aas.org/eye-safety and https://eclipse.aas.org/eye-safety/iso-certification. Look through green Shade 14 welder's glass, or through special eclipse glasses ("CE certified") sold by a reputable vendor such as Rainbow Symphony; see https://eclipse.aas.org/resources/solar-filters for an extensive list of options. The filter *must* block 99.999% of the Sun's visible light and 100% of the Sun's ultraviolet and infrared light, or your eyes could be very seriously damaged (even blindness is possible). Regular sunglasses (even polarized ones) are NOT suitable at all, and neither is smoked glass or an exposed/developed film negative. If you use binoculars or a telescope, a proper filter *must* be placed at the front end of the device (closest to the Sun). Please be VERY careful when observing the Sun!

You can also use the pinhole camera technique, which is much safer: punch a hole (roughly the width of a pencil is a reasonable size) in a sheet of cardboard and look at the image of the Sun projected onto a shaded region below the cardboard. If you use a colander or other object having lots of holes (such as a straw hat), you'll get many images of the partially eclipsed Sun. Holes between the leaves of a tree can act like pinhole cameras and produce many Sun images on the ground.

SAFE WAY TO VIEW SOLAR ECLIPSE also andrewcarnegie.tripod.com/solflyer2.htm